Navigation

Publics Right to Know

Stimulus transparency a work in progress — Federal spending Web site basic; state's improving

Ever since Steve Watson had his first job at age 16 picking asparagus, he's paid his taxes. And he's always wanted to ensure the government spends his money wisely.

So naturally, when the 53-year-old heard that President Barack Obama pledged a new era of transparency with his 3-week-old $787 billion stimulus package, Watson was glad he could log online and check how every dollar was spent.

National experts visit Oregon to testify in support of precedent-setting transparency legislation

Salem, OR — Amidst renewed calls from the Obama administration for accountability from private contractors on the federal level, the Oregon State House of Representatives is considering a bill that would far outstrip the contractor accountability provisions maintained by any state governments to date.

This Monday at 8am, leading transparency experts from the national Coalition for an Accountable Recovery (CAR) will testified before the Oregon House Business and Labor Committee in support of the bill, HB 2037, which would require private contractors in Oregon to disclose the number of employees and the wages, they pay. This is especially important with the federal government requiring transparency on jobs created through the $6.48 billion in federal funds set aside for Oregon under the recovery plan.

Privatization Conference Call

On Thursday, December 13th at 1pm EST the Progressive States will be holding a conference call on bringing transparency to privatization by state governments.

Privatizing in the Dark: The Pitfalls of Privatization & Why Budget Disclosure is Needed

Privatizing in the Dark: The Pitfalls of Privatization & Why Budget Disclosure is Needed

Monday, December 10th, 2007

Ranking the States on Online Disclosure of Govt Contracts, Subsidies and Lobbying

Ranking the States on Online Disclosure of Govt Contracts, Subsidies and Lobbying

Thursday, November 15th, 2007

OpenLeft

People often talk about the "Old Left" and "New Left", but where does MoveOn fit? What about DailyKos, or ActBlue? Chris Bowers, Mike Lux, and Matt Stoller have started OpenLeft with the premise that these are not just cheaper versions of previous tools of the progressive infrastructure, but rather a new "operating system" for politics; one that is more open, responsive, and fluid.